Илья Below are the 10 most recent journal entries recorded in the "Илья" journal:

[<< Previous 10 entries]

May 25th, 2015
11:58 pm

[Link]

Reading log
Stephen Budiansky, Battle of Wits (2000, re-reading). This is a story of Polish, British and American cryptanalysis during World War II. Most of the book is dedicated to the celebrated breaking of the Enigma code, achieving a fair balance between the technical description of the codebreaking and the concurrent human drama. What this book tells, and the recent biopic of Alan Turing doesn't, is just how massive the decryption effort was. The film shows one cryptanalytic machine, restored by the museum at Bletchley Park; in fact, there were 142 machines of this model built, about 125 machines of an American model with an electronic stop sensor, and dozens of machines of other models that attacked different variants of the Enigma code used by different branches of the German armed forces. One of them contained 3,500 vacuum tubes; for comparison, ENIAC contained 17,000 vacuum tubes. Allied cryptanalysts also made extensive use of IBM punched-card proto-computers, and built computing devices that attacked codes other than Enigma; though the book does not mention it, one of them used DRAM before it was a word!

The big problem with military codebreaking is using the operational intelligence obtained by breaking codes without revealing to the enemy that his codes have been broken. Surely, if a German attack submarine meets a German supply submarine at a prearranged place in North Atlantic at a prearranged time, it is highly suspicious if an American attack submarine is already waiting for them there. The Germans of course considered the possibility that their codes had been broken, but they also considered other possibilities: that the Americans tracked down the submarines by their radar signatures, or by their infrared emissions, or that there was a spy in the German Navy; they couldn't decide one way or the other. Of course, unlike in the film, it wasn't the cryptographers themselves who made the decision, which intelligence to share with soldiers in the field.

There is a popular conception that Bletchley Park won World War II or shortened it by a few years. Its proponents, says this book, ignore the atomic bomb, which was being developed with a view to be used against Germany. It certainly helped win the Battle of the Atlantic, but so did the development of radar, Leigh light, the Hedgehog mortar and other antisubmarine weapons; you can't easily isolate the value of Bletchley Park decrypts from everything else.

This book also deals with the breaking of the German Lorenz cipher, which Adolf Hitler used to communicate with his generals, the Japanese naval code and the Soviet diplomatic code. The first helped prepare for the Normandy landings; the second helped assassinate Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto; the third revealed the extent of Soviet espionage against the American atomic bomb program.

Tags: , ,

(1 comment | Leave a comment)

May 15th, 2015
12:28 am

[Link]

Reading log
David E. Fisher, A Race on the Edge of Time (1988). This book purports to be about radar in World War II, but it really strays off to tell the story of the Battle of Britain in Great Britain's Great Patriotic War. It also tells the story of Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding, the head of the RAF Fighter Command who won the Battle of Britain and prevented the Luftwaffe from gaining air superiority over Britain and launching Operation Sea Lion, an amphibious invasion of the island. This was done with radar: a chain of coastal towers of HF radar detected German aircraft even before they invaded British airspace; as designed by Chief Marshal Dowding, information about them was relayed to the headquarters, which directed fighter aircraft, mostly Supermarine Spitfires and Hawker Hurricanes, and antiaircraft guns. Two decades later this system was replicated on a grand scale as SAGE, defending North America from Soviet nuclear bombers; fortunately, unlike the Dowding system, SAGE never saw combat. The Battle of Britain was followed by the Blitz, where German bombers were opposed by Bristol Beaufighter and de Havilland Mosquito night fighters equipped with the centimeter radar; though it took months, radar improved and aircrews learned to use it to the point of making the cost of nighttime raids on London prohibitive for the Luftwaffe.

Never was so much owed by so many to so few - who prevailed by so thin a margin. When France was losing World War II in 1940, Winston Churchill requested that more British fighter squadrons be sent there, no one in the war cabinet dared contradict the Prime Minister, but Chief Marshal Dowding did: "If the present rate of wastage continued for another fortnight we shall not have a single Hurricane left in France or in this country," and the fighters remained in Britain. What if someone more conformist had been in his place? What if instead of investing in radar, British scientists had invested in detecting airplanes by their infrared emissions, which was a blind alley? History of the world would have been different.

This book also tells about the usage of radar in antisubmarine warfare during World War II. What this book does not cover properly, which I know is a fascinating story, is the role of electronic warfare in the strategic bombing campaign over Germany, when the tables were turned a few years later, and how radar-guided anti-aircraft fire, directed by electromechanical analog computers, brought down the V1 cruise missile over Britain during the Blitz 2.0.

Tags: , ,

(1 comment | Leave a comment)

May 12th, 2015
01:14 pm

[Link]

Ансамбль Христа Спасителя
Последние несколько дней постоянно слушаю эту песню в связи, например, с этими картинками, которые принес интернет:



(видеоряд мне не нравится, но я не нашел исполнений, которые можно было бы вставить в блог, на чисто звуковых сайтах)

Tags: ,

(4 comments | Leave a comment)

May 9th, 2015
09:34 pm

[Link]

Политическое
Решил записать кое-какие мысли, которые я хотел включить во вчерашнюю запись, но она как-то сама написалась без них.

Я во вторник закончил перечтение романа британского детективщика Лена Дейтона "Бомбардировщик", написанного в 1970 году. Этот роман рассказывает о бомбардировке Германии Королевскими Военно-Воздушными Силами летом 1943 года, как с точки зрения британских летчиков-бомбардировщиков, так и с точки зрения немецких летчиков-истребителей, немецких гражданских лиц-жертв бомбежки, и т. д. Там есть такая сюжетная линия. Двадцатилетний немецкий летчик-истребитель случайно обнаруживает документы о медицинских экспериментах над заключенными в концентрационном лагере Дахау, проделанных по заказу люфтваффе, в которых сотни заключенных замораживали до смерти, замораживали, а потом размораживали, и душили в барокамерах. Он выкрадывает эти документы, фотокопирует их, и посылает их разным чинам люфтваффе в надежде организовать протест. Конечно, из этой затеи ничего не выходит; летчика арестовывают, и в конце романа казнят. В числе прочих, летчик делится этими документами со своим командиром. Командир произносит длинную речь о том, почему он считает, что его подчиненный неправ; в этой речи есть такой пассаж:
Конечно, мы не можем одобрить то, что происходит, эти лагеря, о которых разговаривают шепотом, охоту на евреев и коммунистов, как на ведьм, "дипломатию канонерок", которой Гитлер присоединил Австрию, а потом - Чехословакию. Все это - зло, но все это делала Британия, или сделала бы, если бы это было необходимо, чтобы достичь положения великой державы. Если Гитлер обманывает, он обманывает ради Германии; если он крадет, он крадет ради Германии; если он убивает, он убивает тоже ради Германии.

Я постоянно вижу в интернетах россиян, которые относятся к Путину так же, как этот литературный персонаж-оберлейтенант люфтваффе относится к Гитлеру. Россия под руководством Путина достигает положения великой державы, и ради этого можно обманывать, красть, убивать, предаваться изнеженности нравов с гусями. Вот типичный разговор (Яндекс не находит; я воспроизвожу по памяти):
...Collapse )

Tags:

(149 comments | Leave a comment)

May 7th, 2015
07:17 pm

[Link]

9 мая
Новый год, новая запись.

Вторая Мировая война в Европе, восточный фронт которой традиционно в СССР и в России называют Великой Отечественной войной, закончилась 70 лет назад. Это означает, учитывая известную ожидаемую продолжительность жизни, что людей, в сколь-либо сознательном возрасте ее заставших, осталось всего несколько сот тысяч на 300 миллионов населения постсоветских стран. В свою очередь, это означает, что понимание, что большая война - это не парады и флаги, а смерть и увечья, с которыми инвалиды живут оставшуюся жизнь, на фронте, и полуголод, а иногда и настоящий голод в тылу и в оккупации, а если тыл и оккупированные территории бомбят, то те же смерть и увечья, - это понимание было присуще советским гражданам первые десятилетия после войны, но с тех пор среди российских граждан оно полностью выветрилось. Вот мой недавний ЖЖ-разговор с москвичом:
- [украинцы кричат:] "Россия с нами воюет" [...]

- Прошу прощения, но "Россия с нами воюет" - факт, доказанный уже в июле прошлого года [...].

- Ну воюет и воюет. Тогда немного обидно за державу - давно пора было бы победить и закрыть тему.

- Вы ответили на вопрос, заданный Евгением Евтушенко и Марком Бернесом: "Хотят ли русские войны?".

Факт, что много русских хотят войны, только чтобы она велась против более слабого противника, и не затрагивала их лично. Это желание активно разжигает российская государственная пропаганда. Ирония заключается в том, что эта пропаганда ведется, используя историческую память о Великой Отечественной войне, сконструированную во времена Брежнева и Суслова и обновленную во времена Путина и Мединского. Несколько дней назад я честно попробовал посмотреть первые несколько минут передачи Аркадия Мамонтова про трагедию в Одессе 2 мая 2014 года. Меня впечатлило, хоть и не удивило, во-первых, неироническое употребление термина "киевская хунта", а во-вторых, утверждение, что антимайдановца, сгоревшего в Доме Профсоюзов, сожгли "нацисты". Если в Украине у власти нацисты, то значит, с ними нужно воевать, как наши деды воевали с историческими нацистами.
...Collapse )

Tags: ,

(93 comments | Leave a comment)

April 18th, 2015
09:34 am

[Link]

Народное
Сценка с демонстрации протеста против войны в Украине в первых числах января 2015 года (про убийствo пенсионерки в Харькове газеты написали 6 января, и герой ролика говорит, что оно произошло "вчера"); это Россия, но я не знаю, где. Кто-нибудь узнает конную статую, показанную на 3:00?



- Во-первых, войска еще никто не ввел. Будет опасность для русских - введут войска.

- Русский народ, который живет на Украине, попросил их [sic] защитить.

Вот как в голове у мужчины в кожаной куртке умещаются эти два взаимоисключающих утверждения? Он следует завету Егора Холмогорова про вранье всей страной, что ли?

ЗЫ: говорят, что это Исаакиевская площадь в Питере.

Tags:

(28 comments | Leave a comment)

April 17th, 2015
08:55 pm

[Link]

Reading log
Rob Manning, William L. Simon, Mars Rover Curiosity (2014). Mars Science Laboratory is one of the great engineering projects of our time, a robot geologist and climatologist exploring Mars that is five times as heavy as the previous generation's Mars Exploration Rovers and carries ten times the mass of scientific instruments. How was it made? Over budget, over allotted time (it was originally supposed to launch in 2009, but didn't make the launch date, so it launched in 2011). With novel technology such as the skycrane landing. With some elegant engineering solutions (how will the descent stage know that the rover has touched the ground? its thrust will only support half as much weight as it did when the rover was in the air, so the descent stage will start rising, and will notice it). With a lot of testing, bugs, fixes, more testing, and so on. When the electrical cable between the descent stage and the rover is disconnected, the voltage in the rover's electronics changes, and it turned out that a certain computer chip was too sensitive to voltage changes, so the connection between the descent stage and the rover had to be redesigned. If the mechanism that provides hammering action for the drill breaks off, it can cause a short circuit, frying all the rover's electronics, so the rover's belly had to be opened and a new grounding wire installed two months before launch. Younger team members would ask Manning, "Is it always like this?", and he would reply, "No, this is the toughest project I've ever seen." If you are in a mood for engineering drama, this is a book for you, and so are other books on Mars rovers.

Tags:

(1 comment | Leave a comment)

April 14th, 2015
12:16 am

[Link]

Социолингвистическое
Любопытный ролик 2005 года. Русская крымчанка 1920х (по-видимому) годов рождения рассказывает о своей жизни как по-русски, так и по-крымскотатарски:



У моей бабушки был племянник 1924-1943 годов жизни; я несколько дней назад вспомнил бабушкин рассказ о том, что когда он в первый раз пришел домой из первого класса, он объявил: "Я це все знаю, я це все чув". Его отец был белорус, мать еврейка; дома они разговаривали по-русски (моя бабушка и ее сестра и брат совсем не знали идиша, что нехарактерно для евреев того поколения). Почему же он это сказал по-украински? Наверное, он ходит в украинский детский сад; наверное, в годы политики украинизации в Харькове не было достаточного числа русскоязычных детских садов. The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.

В книжке светлейшего князя Анатоля Ливена про войну в Чечне рассказывается, как автор встретился с советским немцем, в 1941 году депортированным из Украины в Казахстан, где он влюбился в чеченку и в ее народ, женился на ней, принял ислам, из Вильгельма стал Мухаммедом, а при Горбачеве и хаджи Мухаммедом, и к пожилому возрасту стал главой большого клана и старейшиной тейпа. И такое бывает.

Tags: ,

(2 comments | Leave a comment)

April 12th, 2015
06:16 pm

[Link]

Reading log
James Mahaffey, Atomic Accidents (2014). The first explosion of a nuclear reactor took place in Nazi Germany in 1942. In a heavy water-based reactor built for a neutron multiplication experiment, the uranium caught on fire and exploded, showering the laboratory building with burning metal, which caused further fires. There have been more reactor accidents since, and this book goes over many of them. At the Windscale Unit 1 reactor in northern England in 1957, graphite caught on fire. At the SL-1 reactor in Idaho in 1961, water flashed into steam, which exploded. At the Chernobyl Unit 4 reactor in Soviet Ukraine in 1986, both things happened. This book goes through the causes and timelines of all these accidents. In the Sodium Reactor Experiment in 1959, the uranium was supposed to be in a stainless steel cartridge; its mark of stainless steel had a melting point far above the temperature reached in the reactor during an accident; yet the uranium and its radioactive decay products found their way into the sodium; what happened? Well, it was so hot that the uranium diffused into the stainless steel, creating a new alloy with a lower melting point; no one anticipated it. At the SL-1 reactor, an operator was supposed to lift a 100-pound control rod one inch; he lifted it 23 inches; we don't know, why, because he was instantly killed before revealing his motive. As also told in the book with the sensationalist title We Almost Lost Detroit, in the Fermi I breeder reactor, a sheet of zirconium was added as an extra safety feature not noted on the prints approved by the AEC; in 1966, the flow of sodium ripped it out and caused it to block an outlet, increasing core temperature and causing two fuel assemblies to melt down; after the crushed sheet was fished out of the reactor with great effort, it took a while before it was identified. There is a famous essay by software engineer Joel Spolsky saying that all abstractions are leaky; apparently, in nuclear engineering you can't abstract mechanics, chemistry and nuclear physics away from each other; they all glom onto each other. For example, when neutrons bombard graphite for months at a time, they displace the atoms, which causes the material to expand; synthetic graphite, such as that used in the Hanford B reactor, expands perpendicularly to the extrusion axis, while natural graphite, such as that used in the Windscale reactors, expands through all axes; this played a role in the Windscale fire.

In addition to accidents in nuclear reactors that were designed as such, this book also describes a number of criticality accidents, which is to say nuclear chain reactions in places that were not intended to be nuclear reactors. One particularly bizarre one took place in 1968 at Kombinat Mayak, the Soviet equivalent of the Hanford site, and involved a 60-liter stainless steel bucket with two handles, possibly stolen from the cafeteria kitchen, which had no business being near a plutonium solution. A night shift supervisor and two operators performed an unauthorized experiment, which involved one of the operators pouring a plutonium solution into the bucket. Flash! When radiation alarms sounded and everyone has evacuated, the supervisor talked the radiation monitor into allowing him back into the room, and he made the bucket fall into a puddle of plutonium solution. Flash again! In 1994 the supervisor, who absorbed 2,450 rems, was nominated for a Darwin award.

Tags:

(Leave a comment)

April 7th, 2015
01:09 pm

[Link]

Физическое
Никому больше не кажется, что использование этого девайса на автомобиле противоречит Закону сохранения энергии?

Вот, кстати, ответ на вопрос, зачем будущим не-физикам в школе изучать физику: чтобы не тратить деньги на такие девайсы.

(via /r/wind)

Tags:

(57 comments | Leave a comment)

[<< Previous 10 entries]

Powered by LiveJournal.com